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Courtesy of MIF&W press release. here.

Maine People See Through Media’s Attempt to Smear Wardens

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The Portland Press Herald this morning has again launched another one-sided story challenging the Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife. Today’s story, with contributions by Colin Woodard, was produced by a new author, perhaps as another attempt at credibility. Maine people have voiced their opinion loud and clear and have seen through this attack. The newspaper has taken on a personality that no longer reflects Maine values. Maine people are different. We have strong core values. We respect our friends and neighbors. We tell the truth.

The May 13 Portland Press Herald story surgically pulled a few words from a judge’s ruling in order to intentionally mislead readers as to the actual meaning of the judge’s statement. This was clearly meant to mislead readers into believing the game warden acted inappropriately. Here is the judge’s statement in its entirety.

“The Warden’s activities here were clearly designed to infiltrate himself with Perry, Perry’s friends, and clients so he could personally observe violations. His testimony was replete with instances of how he attempted to avoid committing a crime personally. We are not convinced that the wardens’ conduct was so outrageous that due process requires a dismissal of all charges.”

Meanwhile, our sister State of New Hampshire is managing an incident that took place at 2:00 AM this morning in which two Police officers in Manchester, New Hampshire were shot. Numerous media outlets in Maine and around the Nation reported on this; the Portland Press Herald had not made this a headline as of 5:00 this evening. It would seem they would rather focus on their attempts to smear rather than report on newsworthy events.

It is quite evident the paper has an agenda. A reporter could go anywhere in the State of Maine or across the country and find defendants in any case, whether it is drug busts or prostitution rings, and find those that have been convicted who have a story to tell about how their lives have been impacted because the police held them accountable for their poor decisions.

As a result of the ongoing character assault by the Portland Press Herald and Colin Woodard, the game warden’s family has been subjected to ongoing harassment and inappropriate conduct by some, which has put his family through tremendous anxiety and stress. These behaviors are inappropriate, illegal and will not be tolerated.

The subject of today’s Press Herald story, Richard Sanborn Sr. of Parsonsfield, has subsequently been served a Cease of Harassment Notice this afternoon by Maine State Police for repeated harassing phone calls to the game warden.

The career of a game warden is dangerous. We conserve natural resources and we save lives. Maine people are tuned in, nearly 400,000 of us on our social media alone. Maine people know the difference.

Respectfully – Corporal John MacDonald – Spokesperson – Maine Warden Service

About Alexander Theberge

Alex is the former creative director of The Maine Sportsman. An avid fisherman and professional photographer he enjoys everything about the outdoors.
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