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The January 2018 Issue of The Maine Sportsman

In Maine, Hardwater Fishing for Lunkers Ain’t that Hard!

It’s January, and the attentions of many sportsmen, sportswomen and sports-kids turn to ice fishing on Maine’s lakes, ponds and rivers.

This month’s issue of The Maine Sportsman magazine helps fuel that enthusiasm, starting with the cover photo of our “Central Maine” columnist, Steve Vose, holding up a monstrous 34-inch northern pike pulled through the ice on the Androscoggin River.

In his new regional column, Vose presents a “Pike Fishing Primer,” revealing how to catch lunkers in such area water bodies as Great Pond, Messalonskee Lake, Long Pond, North Pond and Lake Annabessacook.

Are lake trout more to your liking? Then catch “Togue Tactics for Ice Anglers,” which provides the where-to and how-to for bringing these deep-water fish up and out of the hole.

January also signals the start of serious snowmobiling. Regular contributor Cathy Genthner covers the events, parades, races and other goings-on for sledders during the month of January, in her “Mark your Calendars for a Full Season of Sledding Fun” article. She will continue next month with February’s events. Locate and review this special feature, especially to see the photo line-up of nine vintage, red, rear-engine Polaris Sno-Travelers that will likely make an appearance at Millinocket events this winter.

William Sheldon also focuses on snowmobiling this month in his “Katahdin Country” column, where he recommends that those planning to ride in the area start out by making inquiry through the Katahdin Chamber of Commerce website. For those who do not own a sled, he suggests renting one from places such as New England Outdoor Center, which is located on Twin Pines Road in Millinocket.

Meanwhile, in his “Off-Road Traveler” column, William Clunie helps riders prepare for carefree miles on the trails by reminding us of how to maintain and equip our sleds for reliability and safety.

Snowmobiling not exciting enough for you? Try dog sled racing, which is covered in this month’s “Danger in the Outdoors” piece by columnist David Van Wie. The author describes true tales of capsized sleds, runaway dog teams and broken equipment. Best leave this competitive sport to the professionals!

All this, and your usual favorites – classic bass lure tales in “Jottings,” a trout fly so good it will save your marriage, according to “Freshwater Fly Fishing” writer Lou Zambello; Part 2 of Zachary Fowler’s “50-Day Fire” Patagonian memoir; as well as bears (“New Hampshire”); coyotes (“Western Maine Mountains”); wild boars (at least 3D targets thereof) in “Southern Maine”; a portable generators buyers’ guide, and much, much more.

Enjoy the issue! If you’ve got something to say, write our editorial staff a short letter to the editor (and provide photos, if you’ve got them), and email everything to Will@MaineSportsman.com.

Give us a call at 207-622-4242 – talk with Linda, Chris or Victoria in the office. Subscribe or renew your subscription, either on the phone or using the “Subscribe” link at our website, www.MaineSportsman.com. Keep in touch as a Facebook friend.

And thanks once again this month to our informed readers, our many distribution outlets and our loyal advertisers.

Next month – Biggest bucks roster and trophy photos from the fall, 2017 season; more on ice fishing and snowmobiling; and boating information to get you enthused about the winter boat show season.

Zachary Fowler returns, this time to tell us how to build a weatherproof, long-lasting shelter in the Maine woods out of native saplings and swamp-grass. And don’t forget – you’ll be able to meet Fowler, who’ll be a featured speaker at the State of Maine Sportsman’s Show March 30 – April 1 (Easter weekend), 2018 at the Augusta Civic Center. Mark your calendar now!

Will Lund, editor

Will@MaineSportsman.com

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